THE HISTORICAL CLIMATE DATA FOR YAKUTSK, RUSSIA, ONE OF THE COLDEST CITIES ON EARTH

YakutskRussiahistoricaldata1

THE HISTORICAL CLIMATE DATA FOR YAKUTSK, RUSSIA, ONE OF THE COLDEST CITIES ON EARTH

This is a slightly revised version of the document posted earlier. (Sorry, wish I can figure out how to delete files that were uploaded in the earlier post, making this unnecessary!) The historical temperatures data for this city, recently featured in a Weather Channel article, is plotted in Figures 2 and 3. Classical statistical methods lead to the conclusion that the annual average temperature has been increasing. However, a more careful examination reveals the movement of the temperature data along the parallels seen in Figure 3. This means that the average annual temperature in 2013, although higher than in 196os, is actually lower than it would have been had the trend illustrated by the parallel V continued. The temperature-time data at the local level, here the coldest city on earth, thus reveals a work function (the nonzero intercept A) as with global average temperature data.

Here’s the link to the website from which the temperature data was obtained, http://www.tutiempo.net/en/Climate/Jakutsk/03-2013/249590.htm

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One thought on “THE HISTORICAL CLIMATE DATA FOR YAKUTSK, RUSSIA, ONE OF THE COLDEST CITIES ON EARTH

  1. Here’s a simple explanation for the movement of the temperature data along the parallels. When the sun rises each morning, the solar energy flux begins to warm up the earth’s surface. Not all of this energy (or solar irradiance, Watts per square meter), however, goes to raising the earth’s temperature, T, locally or globally. According to the kinetic theory of gases, the temperature T is directly proportional to the average translational kinetic energy of the atoms or molecules of an ideal gas. Thus, the annual average temperature T, and likewise the global average temperature when we study global data, is a direct measure of the energy that has been transferred to the earth as a result of the energy flux received from the sun.

    Replacing E and K in Einstein’s photoelectric law with the energy received from the sun and the energy absorbed by the earth (raising its temperature) provides the explanation that we are seeking for the movement of the temperature data along the nearly perfect parallel lines seen in Figure 3.

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